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Hope Leslie, Vol. 1

By: Catharine Maria Sedgwick

Governor Winthrop naturally concluded, (for all persons not deeply interested are apt to be rational,) that Miss Leslie had taken refuge under some safe covert, and he summoned his family totheir evening devotions. Both the Fletchers excused themselves, and braved the storm in quest of their lost treasure; and even old Cradock, in spite of Mrs. Grafton's repeated suggestions that he was a very useless person for such an enterprise, sallied forth; but all returned in the ...

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Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine

By: George M. Gould

Excerpt: PREFATORY AND Introductory Note. Since the time when man?s mind first busied itself with subjects beyond his own self?preservation and the satisfaction of his bodily appetites, the anomalous and curious have been of exceptional and persistent fascination to him; and especially is this true of the construction and functions of the human body. Possibly, indeed, it was the anomalous that was largely instrumental in arousing in the savage the attention, thought, and...

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The Gilded Age

By: Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner

Henry Brierly took the stand. Requested by the District Attorney to tell the jury all he knew about the killing, he narrated the circumstances substantially as the reader already knows them. He accompanied Miss Hawkins to New York at her request, supposing she was coming in relation to a bill then pending in Congress, to secure the attendance of absent members. Her note to him was here shown. She appeared to be very much excited at the Washington station. After she had a...

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My Disillusionment in Russia

By: Emma Goldman

Excerpt: Chapter 1. DEPORTATION TO RUSSIA ON THE night of December 21, 1919, together with two hundred and forty?eight other political prisoners, I was deported from America. Although it was generally known we were to be deported, few really believed that the United States would so completely deny her past as an asylum for political refugees, some of whom had lived and worked in America for more than thirty years. In my own case, the decision to eliminate me first became...

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The Wigwam and the Cabin, Volume 1

By: William Gilmore Simms

Excerpt: The Tales which follow have been the accumulation of several years. They were mostly written for the annuals, an expensive form of publication which kept them from the great body of readers. In this form, however, they met with favour, and it is thought that their merits are such as will justify their collection in a compact volume. The material employed will be found to illustrate, in large degree, the border history of the South. I can speak with confidence of...

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The Sad Fortunes of the Reverend Amos Barton

By: George Eliot

Chapter 1 SHEPPERTON Church was a very different-looking building five-and-twenty years ago. To be sure, its substantial stone tower looks at you through its intelligent eye, the clock, with the friendly expression of former days; but in everything else what changes! Now there is a wide span of slated roof flanking the old steeple; the windows are tall and symmetrical; the outer doors are resplendent with oak-graining, the inner doors reverentially noiseless with a garme...

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The History of the Next French Revolution

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

It is seldom that the historian has to record events more singular than those which occurred during this year, when the Crown of France was battled for by no less than four pretenders, with equal claims, merits, bravery, and popularity. First in the list we placeā€”His Royal Highness Louis Anthony Frederick Samuel Anna Maria, Duke of Brittany, and son of Louis -- XVI. The unhappy Prince, when a prisoner with his unfortunate parents in the Temple, was enabled to escape from...

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Astoria; Or, Anecdotes of an Enterprise Beyond the Rocky Mountains

By: Washinton Irving

IN THE COURSE of occasional visits to Canada many years since, I became intimately acquainted with some of the principal partners of the great Northwest Fur Company, who at that time lived in genial style at Montreal, and kept almost open house for the stranger. At their hospitable boards I occasionally met with partners, and clerks, and hardy fur traders from the interior posts; men who had passed years remote from civilized society, among distant and savage tribes, and...

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The Tragedy of King Lear

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: THE Tragedie of King Lear Actus Primus. Scoena Prima. Enter Kent, Gloucester, and Edmond. Kent. I thought the King had more affected the Duke of Albany, then Cornwall The Tragedie of King Lear 1 Glou. It did alwayes seeme so to vs: But now in the diuision of the Kingdome, it appeares not which of the Dukes hee valewes most, for qualities are so weigh?d, that curiosity in neither, can make choise of eithers moity Kent. Is not this your Son, my Lord? Glou. His bre...

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The Age of Innocence

By: Edith Wharton

On a January evening of the early seventies, Christine Nilsson was singing in Faust at the Academy of Music in New York. Though there was already talk of the erection, in remote metropolitan distances above the Forties, of a new Opera House which should compete in costliness and splendour with those of the great European capitals, the world of fashion was still content to reassemble every winter in the shabby red and gold boxes of the sociable old Academy. Conservatives ...

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Chess Strategy

By: Edward Lasker

As the first edition of Edward Laskcr's CHESS STRATEGY was exhausted within a comparatively short time of its appearance, the author set himself the task of altering and improving the work to such an extent that it became to all intents and purposes a new book. I had the privilege of co-operating with him to a slight degree on that second edition, and was in consequence able to appreciate the tremendous amount of work he voluntarily took upon himself to do; I say volunta...

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Ivanhoe

By: Sir Walter Scott

INTRODUCTION: The species of publication which has come to be generally known by the title of ANNUAL, being a miscellany of prose and verse, equipped with numerous engravings, and put forth every year about Christmas, had flourished for a long while in Germany before it was imitated in this country by an enterprising bookseller, a German by birth, Mr. Ackermann. The rapid success of his work, as is the custom of the time, gave birth to a host of rivals, and, among others...

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The Apology

By: Xenophon

Excerpt: Among the reminiscences of Socrates, none, as it seems to me, is more deserving of record than the counsel he took with himself[2] (after being cited to appear before the court), not only with regard to his defence, but also as to the ending of his life. Others have written on this theme, and all without exception have touched upon[3] the lofty style of the philosopher,[4] which may be taken as a proof that the language used by Socrates was really of that type. ...

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Ion

By: E.P. Coleridge

Excerpt: MERCURY Atlas, that on his brazen shoulders rolls Yon heaven, the ancient mansion of the gods, Was by a goddess sire to Maia; she To supreme Jove bore me, and call?d me Hermes; Attendant on the king, his high behests I execute. To Delphi am I come, This land where Phoebus from his central throne Utters to mortals his high strain, declaring The present and the future; this is the cause; Greece hath a city of distinguish?d glory, Which from the goddess of the gold...

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The Mill on the Floss

By: George Eliot

Excerpt: A WIDE plain, where the broadening Floss hurries on between its green banks to the sea, and the loving tide, rushing to meet it, checks its passage with an impetuous embrace. On this mighty tide the black ships?laden with the fresh?scented fir?planks, with rounded sacks of oil?bearing seed, or with the dark glitter of coal?are borne along to the town of St Ogg?s, which shows its aged, fluted red roofs and the broad gables of its wharves between the low wooded hi...

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Four Wooden Stakes

By: Victor Roman

Excerpt: Remson. Having spent the past three weeks in bringing to a successful termination a case that had puzzled the police and two of the best detective agencies in the city, I decide that I was entitled to a rest, so I ordered two suitcases packed and went in search of a timetable. It was several years since I had seen Remson Holroyd; in fact I had not seen him since we had matriculated from college together. I was curious to 1{now how he was getting along, to say no...

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The Landlord at Lions Head, Volume 1

By: William Dean Howells

In those dim recesses of the consciousness where things have their beginning, if ever things have a beginning, I suppose the origin of this novel may be traced to a fact of a fortnight's sojourn on the western shore of lake Champlain in the summer of 1891. Across the water in the State of Vermont I had constantly before my eyes a majestic mountain form which the earlier French pioneers had named Le Lion Couchant, but which their plainer-minded Yankee successors preferred to call...

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The Fighting Governor

By: Charles W. Colby

The Canada to which Frontenac came in 1672 was no longer the infant colony it had been when Richelieu founded the Company of One Hundred Associates. Through the efforts of Louis XIV and Colbert it had assumed the form of an organized province. [Footnote: See The Great Intendant in this Series.] Though its inhabitants numbered less than seven thousand, the institutions under which they lived could not have been more elaborate or precise. In short, the divine right of the ...

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The History of the Adventures of Joseph Andrews and His Friend Mr....

By: Henry Fielding

PREFACE: As it is possible the mere English Reader may have a different Idea of Romance with the Author of these little Volumes; and may consequently expect a kind of Entertainment, not to be found, nor which was even intended, in the following Pages; it may not be improper to premise a few Words concerning this kind of Writing, which I do not remember to have seen hitherto attempted in our Language. The Epic as well as the Drama is divided into Tragedy and Comedy. Homer...

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The Mountebank, The

By: William J. Locke

Excerpt: Chapter One. In the month of June, 1919, I received a long letter from Brigadier?General Andrew Lackaday together with a bulky manuscript. The letter, addressed from an obscure hotel in Marseilles, ran as follows:? MY DEAR FRIEND, On the occasion of our last meeting when I kept you up to an ungodly hour of the morning with the story of my wretched affairs to which you patiently listened without seeming bored, you were good enough to suggest that I might write a ...

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